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www.reference.com/world-view/first-constitution-united-states-a8aebaef363dff57

The first constitution of the United States was the Articles of Confederation. It was a document signed among the 13 original colonies that established the United States of America as a confederation of sovereign states.

www.reference.com/article/can-united-states-constitution-amended-d60992236d6b4156

The United States Constitution may be amended either by a two-thirds vote by the House of Representatives and the Senate followed by subsequent state level ratification or by a Convention called for by two-thirds of state legislatures and subsequent state level ratifica...

www.reference.com/world-view/summary-article-one-united-states-constitution-7110c8df51475339

Article 1 of the U.S. Constitution establishes the legislative branch of the U.S. government, the U.S. Congress. The longest of the articles to the Constitution, Article I is broken down into 10 sections, and describes the organization of Congress and its delegated powe...

www.reference.com/world-view/20th-amendment-constitution-united-states-40efdd689b2d228b

The 20th Amendment of the Constitution of the United States sets out the date in the year that the president terms run from, states the date that Congress should meet every year and explains what happens if there is no president in office. The amendment is divided into ...

www.reference.com/article/17th-amendment-united-states-constitution-80d59e83e39809da

The 17th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution establishes the direct election of senators by popular vote. Before the passage of the 17th Amendment, senators were elected by state legislatures.

www.reference.com/world-view/introduction-united-states-constitution-called-619874cd9a334977

The introduction of the United States Constitution is called the Preamble. This introduction is just one sentence long, but it has been referred to in many judicial opinions and speeches.

www.reference.com/world-view/bill-rights-added-united-states-constitution-7069efeb6769cdc8

The Bill of Rights was added to the United States Constitution to guarantee the protection of the people from a strong central government. It served as a compromise between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists to achieve the ratification of the Constitution.