Racial segregation finished de jure in the United States in 1954, when a series of Supreme Court decisions were enforced in that sense. However, de facto segregation continued until the 1970s and persists in various degr... More »

One prominent example of racial segregation in the United States was the Jim Crow laws, a series of policies in effect from 1876 to 1965. Jim Crow laws segregated people of color from whites in housing, jobs, schools, pu... More »

Segregation ended in Alabama when the Civil Rights Act was approved by President Lyndon B. Johnson and passed into legislation in 1964. The law prohibited enforced racial separation in public facilities and business esta... More »

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One prominent example of racial segregation in the United States was the Jim Crow laws, a series of policies in effect from 1876 to 1965. Jim Crow laws segregated people of color from whites in housing, jobs, schools, pu... More »

The Civil Rights Act of 1964, legally known as public law 88-352, changed American history by outlawing de jure discrimination and segregation for protected attributes such as race, gender, color, religion or national or... More »

In the 1930s, segregation in America was reversed in the federal government thanks to Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration, and many African American leaders were asking blacks to focus on helping themselves; however, ... More »

Segregationists wanted to impeach Earl Warren because, through his leadership on the U.S. Supreme Court, the segregation of public schools was ruled unconstitutional in a unanimous decision. This prompted legislation tha... More »