ARTICLES

The properties of water include miscibility and condensation, cohesion and adhesion, high surface temperature, high heat capacity, heat of vaporization, capillary action, varying density, electrical conductivity and comp...

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Sweating in humans demonstrates water’s tendency to absorb heat by overcoming the hydrogen bonds that hold its molecules together. This property makes it possible for humans to stay cool via sweating, because water requi...

www.reference.com/science/property-water-demonstrated-sweat-b6e385945d3156db

Water is expressed by the molecular formula H2O and has a molar mass of 18.01 grams per mole. It has a density of 1 gram per cubic centimeter. The melting point of water is 32 degrees Fahrenheit, while the boiling point ...

www.reference.com/article/chemical-properties-water-1ab0eb2c118a74ee

SIMILAR ARTICLES

One example of adhesion is water climbing up a paper towel that has been dipped into a glass of water, and one example of cohesion is rain falling as drops from the sky. During adhesion, water is attracted to other subst...

www.reference.com/science/examples-adhesion-cohesion-256bc13aca409f7d

Metals have several properties that set them apart from nonmetals, such as conductivity, malleability and ductility. They also have a distinctive physical appearance and energy state at room temperature. Metals are locat...

www.reference.com/article/properties-distinguish-metals-nonmetals-20f7819306c637e7

The latent heat of condensation is the energy released when water vapor condenses into water droplets. The process is most readily observed in atmospheric clouds in thunderstorms. According to USA Today, a storm maintain...

www.reference.com/science/latent-heat-condensation-69ddafaffb585067

Water has a high heat capacity because a lot of heat energy is required to break the hydrogen bonds found in a molecule of water. Because the majority of heat energy is concentrated on breaking the hydrogen bonds, the wa...

www.reference.com/science/water-high-heat-capacity-7937c9c620e6f610