The Constitution can be amended if two-thirds of the House of Representatives and the Senate vote for the amendment and three-fourths of the state legislatures ratify it. The Constitution can also be amended if two-third... More »

www.reference.com Government & Politics US Government The Constitution

The Constitutional Amendments numbered 11 through 27 are the true amendments to the Constitution, since the attachment of the first 10 amendments (known as the Bill of Rights) was necessary to secure its ratification. Th... More »

www.reference.com Government & Politics US Government The Constitution

In the context of government and law, a formal amendment is "an addition or alteration made to a constitution, statute, or legislative bill or resolution," according to the Encyclopedia Britannica. The U.S. Constitution ... More »

www.reference.com Government & Politics Law

The United States Constitution may be amended either by a two-thirds vote by the House of Representatives and the Senate followed by subsequent state level ratification or by a Convention called for by two-thirds of stat... More »

Article V of the U.S. Constitution provides two ways for the proposal of a constitutional amendment: a two-thirds majority vote in both chambers of the U.S. Congress or by a constitutional convention called for by two-th... More »

Under Article Five, the Constitution can be amended in two ways: through a two-thirds majority vote in Congress or by a two-thirds vote of a national convention at the request of at least two-thirds of the states. To bec... More »

The Constitution is difficult to amend because it requires a supermajority of either members of Congress or a supermajority of state legislatures to propose a new amendment for ratification. Even after acquiring the requ... More »