Web Results

lib1.bmcc.cuny.edu/help/sources

historical photographs, and other primary sources for the advanced research scholar. Includes links to libraries and other institutions with digitized primary resources. Using Primary Sources on the Web A brief guide to evaluating primary internet resources with excellent examples of specific documents and image files.

umb.libguides.com/PrimarySources/secondary

Description and examples of Primary vs. Secondary Sources. Primary Sources are immediate, first-hand accounts of a topic, from people who had a direct connection with it. Primary sources can include: Texts of laws and other original documents.

www.scribbr.com/citing-sources/primary-and-secondary-sources

Secondary sources could include documentaries or newspaper articles. Now let’s assume your paper is not about the September 11 attacks itself, but about the media coverage of the September 11 attacks. In this scenario, the documentaries and newspaper articles become the primary sources. Primary vs. secondary sources: which is better?

sccollege.edu/Library/Pages/primarysources.aspx

Secondary Sources. Secondary sources describe, discuss, interpret, comment upon, analyze, evaluate, summarize, and process primary sources. A secondary source is generally one or more steps removed from the event or time period and are written or produced after the fact with the benefit of hindsight.

libguides.bc.edu/englishlit/sources

A secondary source is not an original source. It has no direct physical connection to the person or event being studied. Examples of secondary sources might include: history books, articles in encyclopedias, prints of paintings, replicas of art objects, reviews of research, academic articles.

libguides.apsu.edu/primary_sources

Secondary source materials can be articles in newspapers or popular magazines, book or movie reviews, or articles found in scholarly journals that evaluate or criticize someone else's original research. A tertiary source is a distillation and collection of primary and secondary sources.

ncu.libguides.com/researchprocess/primaryandsecondary

Use secondary sources to obtain an overview of a topic and/or identify primary resources. Refrain from including such resources in an annotated bibliography for doctoral level work unless there is a good reason. Examples of a secondary source are: Publications such as textbooks, magazine articles, book reviews, commentaries, encyclopedias, almanacs

answers.library.cofc.edu/faq/46619

Some secondary sources not only analyze primary sources, but also use them to argue a contention or persuade the reader to hold a certain opinion. Secondary sources are not evidence, but rather commentary on and discussion of evidence. Note: The definition of a secondary source may vary depending upon the discipline or context. Examples include:

www.uvic.ca/library/research/tips/primvsec/index.php

Primary or secondary sources Primary sources. are the original materials or evidence to be analyzed, evaluated, contextualized, or synthesized in the research process. in the Social Science and Humanities, they are usually from the time period under study and offer first-hand accounts or direct evidence responsive to the research question.

subjectguides.esc.edu/researchskillstutorial/primary

Primary sources are created as close to the original event or phenomenon as it is possible to be. For example, a photograph or video of an event is a primary source. Data from an experiment is a primary source. Secondary sources are one step removed from that. Secondary sources are based on or about the primary sources.