The length of the pendulum is directly correlated to its period as per the pendulum equation: T = 2π√(L/g), where T is the period of the pendulum, L is its length, and g is the gravitational constant 9.8 m/s2. Regardless... More »

The amplitude formula for a wave is amplitude (a) = distance traveled by the wave (d) / frequency of the wave (f). The amplitude is the maximum height observed in the wave. Amplitude is measured in decibels (dB). More »

For larger amplitudes, the amplitude does affect the period of the pendulum, with a larger amplitude leading to a larger period. However, for small amplitudes (typically around a few degrees), the amplitude has no effect... More »

The law of the pendulum, discovered by Galileo Galilei, states that swinging objects follow the same path and have a period between swings that remains constant. Galileo attracted immediate attention for the discovery, w... More »

For larger amplitudes, the amplitude does affect the period of the pendulum, with a larger amplitude leading to a larger period. However, for small amplitudes (typically around a few degrees), the amplitude has no effect... More »

The length of a pendulum affects its swing because longer pendulums swing at lower frequencies. A lower frequency causes a longer period and a slower rate of swing. More »

Common examples of simple harmonic motion include an object attached to a spring, a swinging pendulum and loudspeakers. Simple harmonic motion refers to the swinging motion exhibited by any object in the presence of Hook... More »