Web Results

history.nebraska.gov/blog/nebraska-nicknames

Several state nicknames in 1860 were the same as today, for example, the Wisconsin Badgers, Michigan Wolverines, and Iowa Hawkeyes. By the later years of the nineteenth century, “Bug Eaters” had replaced “Squatters” as the unofficial Nebraska nickname.

history.nebraska.gov/publications/nicknames-nebraska-2

Several state nicknames in 1860 were the same as today, for example, the Wisconsin Badgers, Michigan Wolverines, and Iowa Hawkeyes. By the later years of the nineteenth century, "Bug Eaters" had replaced "Squatters" as the Nebraska nickname.

www.huskers.com/ViewArticle.dbml?ATCLID=2802

Iowa partisans seemed to prefer Hawkeyes, so Sherman started referring to the Nebraska team as Cornhuskers, and the 1900 team was first to bear that label. Of course, the name caught on and became a Nebraska byword, eventually becoming the official nickname for the state.

statesymbolsusa.org/symbol-official-item/nebraska/state...

The Cornhusker State. Nebraska's nickname is "The Cornhusker State." Early explorers considered Nebraska and the surrounding areas part of the great American desert. In the 1860's the first wave of homesteaders poured into Nebraska to claim free land granted by the federal government.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nebraska

Nebraska's name is derived from transliteration of the archaic Otoe words Ñí Brásge, pronounced [ɲĩbɾasꜜkɛ] (contemporary Otoe Ñí Bráhge), or the Omaha Ní Btháska, pronounced [nĩbɫᶞasꜜka], meaning "flat water", after the Platte River that flows through the state. History

www.history.com/topics/us-states/nebraska

Nebraska, which was admitted to the union as the 37th state on March 1, 1867, two years after the end of the American Civil War, contains some of the nation’s Shows This Day In History

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_city_nicknames_in_Nebraska

This partial list of city nicknames in Nebraska compiles the aliases, sobriquets and slogans that cities in Nebraska are known by (or have been known by historically), officially and unofficially, to municipal governments, local people, outsiders or their tourism boards or chambers of commerce.

theheismanwinners.com/nebraska

Sherman was aware of the Cornhusker nickname that Iowa had used and began applying it for his Nebraska stories. The Cornhusker name grew tall in Nebraska circles and eventually became the state’s nickname as well. Memorial Stadium: Standing Room Only Since 1962 in the Sea of Red

statesymbolsusa.org/.../state-name-origin/origin-nebraska

Nebraska State Name Origin. quarterNebraskastatequarter.jpg. The U.S. Mint's bicentennial commemorative quarter for Nebraska depicts a covered wagon and Chimney Rock (prominent geological formation in western Nebraska - a national historic site; a landmark along the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails). Nebraska became the 37th state in 1867.

www.britannica.com/place/Nebraska-state

The Missouri was a major highway to the trans-Mississippi West in the early 19th century. The Platte River has also played a significant role in Nebraska’s history. In fact, the state’s name is derived from the Oto Indian word Nebrathka (“Flat Water”), a reference to the Platte. Area 77,347 square miles (200,329 square km).