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quizlet.com/8775345/significance-of-supreme-court-cases...

Significance of Supreme Court Cases. The significance of the cases, the tests developed through them, and their verdicts ... The Court ruled that it was okay for the NY Times to publish the papers because not publishing would have violated the free media and led to a less educated public. ... Near v. Minnesota. The Court ruled that the ...

billofrightsinstitute.org/.../near-v-minnesota-1931

Near v. Minnesota (1931) Summary This Landmark Supreme Court Cases and the Constitution eLesson focuses on the 1931 Supreme Court case Near v. Minnesota. In this landmark freedom of the press case, the Court struck down a state law allowing prior restraint (government censorship in advance) as unconstitutional. In so ruling, the Court applied the […]

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Near_v._Minnesota

Near v. Minnesota, 283 U.S. 697 (1931), is a landmark United States Supreme Court decision that found that prior restraints on publication violate freedom of the press as protected under the First Amendment, a principle that was applied to free speech generally in subsequent jurisprudence.

legaldictionary.net/near-v-minnesota

Minnesota, United States Supreme Court, (1931) Case summary for Near v. Minnesota: Near was prevented from publishing “The Saturday Press” under a state statute which prevented the publication of “malicious, scandalous and defamatory” periodicals. ... because the restraining order restricts the speech from even being published.

supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/283/697

The government does not have the right to prohibit negative speech about it if there is some truth to it. There must be a case-specific analysis to determine whether the allegations have a basis in truth, although war or other types of national emergency may reduce the protections of the press.

www.encyclopedia.com/.../near-v-minnesota-1931

Near v. Minnesota 1931. Appellant: J.M. Near Appellee: State of Minnesota, ex rel. Floyd B. Olson, County Attorney of Hennepin County Appellant's Claim: That a state "gag law" preventing publication of his newspaper violated the First Amendment freedom of the press. Chief Lawyers for Appellant: Weymouth Kirkland and T.E. Latimer Chief Lawyers for Appellee: James E. Markham and Arthur...

money.howstuffworks.com/10-supreme-court-cases-journalists...

10 Most Important U.S. Supreme Court Cases for Journalists. by Marie Willsey Prev NEXT . 10. Near v. Minnesota (1931) This case helped the Supreme Court define freedom of the press and the concept of prior restraint. When Minneapolis newspaper editor Jay Near attacked local officials by claiming in print that they were associated with gangsters ...

quizlet.com/40207424/supreme-court-cases-flash-cards

Near v. Minnesota (1931) Minnesota was a landmark United States Supreme Court decision that recognized the freedom of the press by roundly rejecting prior restraints on publication, a principle that was applied to free speech generally in subsequent jurisprudence.

www.coursehero.com/file/p1pmcet/Save-Question-27-1-point...

Save question 27 1 point which rights do not fall ... Sedition Speech plus Prior restraint 问问问问 Clear and present danger Libel Save Question 33 (1 point) Near v. Minnesota (1931) and Wolf v. Colorado (1949) were significant because they 问问问问问问问问(1931) ...

www.oyez.org/cases/1900-1940/283us697

In a Minneapolis newspaper called The Saturday Press, Jay Near and Howard Guilford accused local officials of being implicated with gangsters. Minnesota officials sought a permanent injunction against The Saturday Press on the grounds that it violated the Public Nuisance Law because it was malicious, scandalous, and defamatory.