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www.reference.com/article/sea-sponges-eat-6ef3931a5ddd8bb2

Most sea sponges are detrivorous, meaning they consume organic debris and various microbes that drift through ocean currents. Harp sponges, however, are carnivorous and use hooks located on their arms to catch shrimp and other small animals.

www.reference.com/article/scientific-name-sea-sponge-4d90ac4a05413582

The scientific name of the sea sponge is Porifera. The sea sponge's scientific name refers to something having pores, and sea sponges have many small pores known as ostia.

www.reference.com/article/sea-sponges-reproduce-64a5fcc34f4fa2e8

Sea sponges reproduce asexually by budding and sexually by releasing male gametes into the water. These gametes are taken in by other sponges, which then produce blastulas that are also released into the water. Budding can be external or internal. Internal budding is reserved for harsh conditions, i

www.reference.com/article/interesting-sea-sponges-26b9b41673ca55fd

Sea sponges are bottom-dwelling, multi-cellular animals. Most sea sponges attach themselves to the ocean floor, other sea animals or rocks for the duration of their lives. A small number of sea sponges are mobile creatures that move along the ocean floor at the rate of 1 to 3 millimeters per day.

www.reference.com/article/give-sponge-bath-elderly-person-b9bb16106fe24826

To give a sponge bath to an elderly person, gather all the items needed for the bath and wash the body area by area until the bath is complete. Only uncover one part of the body at a time to keep the elderly person comfortable, says Drugs.com.

www.reference.com/article/eats-sponges-7788c7b0b34cd315

Marine animals, such as hawksbill sea turtles, angelfish, sea slugs, some starfish and the larvae of sponge-flies, feed on sponges. Not many marine animals eat sponges, because multicellular organisms contain less nutrients, are tough to eat and produce chemical toxins as their form of defense.

www.reference.com/article/sponges-made-f023cf9dffedc488

Sponges used for cleaning are made of either artificial or natural fibers. Artificially produced sponges are made of cellulose fiber or melamine fiber, while natural sponges are made from underwater animals also called sponges or from gourds known as loofahs. Most sponges in use as of 2014 are artif

www.reference.com/article/give-tepid-sponge-bath-1a2bae4f9a462057

Give a tepid sponge bath by washing the body using a sponge and lukewarm water between 90 and 95 degrees Fahrenheit, advises WebMD. A tepid sponge bath is used to clean newborns; reduce fever and rash in children; and care for ill adults and the elderly, according to Mayo Clinic.

www.reference.com/article/clean-sponge-796382f046eeee02

To clean a sponge, soak it in a solution of bleach and water for five minutes. You can also soak the sponge in water and then microwave it on high for one to tow minutes. Alternatively, wash the sponge in a dishwasher on the "heated dry" setting.

www.reference.com/science/examples-sponges-b84ef7cfe3d8405

Three examples of sponges are the calcareous sponges, glass sponges and demospongiae. These all fall under the main category of porifera, the scientific name for sponges.