The dissenting opinions in Miranda v. Arizona stated that the rights granted to suspects in the majority decision had no support in the U.S. Constitution or English common law. The dissenting justices felt the court was ... More »

In 1965, Miranda v. Arizona created a specific set of procedures for police interrogations and evidence, according to the Oyez Project. The case was one of a series involving protections for the accused found in the Fift... More »

In the Miranda v. Arizona case in 1966, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the police must give suspects specific warnings prior to custodial interrogations, notes Brooks Holland for the American Bar Association. The cour... More »

In 1965, Miranda v. Arizona created a specific set of procedures for police interrogations and evidence, according to the Oyez Project. The case was one of a series involving protections for the accused found in the Fift... More »

In the Miranda v. Arizona case in 1966, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the police must give suspects specific warnings prior to custodial interrogations, notes Brooks Holland for the American Bar Association. The cour... More »

The "Near v. Minnesota" Supreme Court decision of 1931 protected the rights of the press against unfair censorship previously allowed by state laws, according to ConstitutionFacts.com. Prior to this decision, it was only... More »

State-recognized common law wives and husbands have the same rights that spouses in traditional marriages have, including the right to collect Social Security benefits and inherit property, reports Nolo. Common law coupl... More »