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byjus.com/biology/mass-flow-hypothesis

The theory behind Mass flow hypothesis which is also called as pressure flow hypothesis describes the movement of sap via phloem, proposed by the German physiologist Ernst Munch in 1930.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pressure_Flow_Hypothesis

The Pressure Flow Hypothesis, also known as the Mass Flow Hypothesis, is the best-supported theory to explain the movement of sap through the phloem. It was proposed by Ernst Munch, a German plant physiologist in 1930. A high concentration of organic substances, particularly sugar, inside cells of the phloem at a source, such as a leaf, creates a diffusion gradient (osmotic gradient) that ...

www.britannica.com/science/pressure-flow-hypothesis

Mass-flow hypotheses include the pressure-flow hypothesis, which states that flow into sieve tubes at source regions (places of photosynthesis or mobilization and exportation of storage products) raises the osmotic pressure in the sieve tube; removal of sugars from sieve tubes in sink regions—i.e ...

answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080509110537AAGMKEV

Best Answer: The mass flow hypothesis in terms of plants, is the following: The accepted mechanism needed for the translocation of sugars from source to sink is called the pressure flow hypothesis. As glucose is made at the source (by photosynthesis for example) it is converted to sucrose (a dissacharide).

getrevising.co.uk/revision-notes/mass-flow-hypothesis

Mass Flow Hypothesis. This suggests that there is a passive movement of sucrose from the phloem (the source), where it is most concentrated, to other areas, such as growing tissues, where sucrose is less concentrated (the sink).. 1. The source cells, such as the mesophyll cells of the leaves, produce sucrose during photosynthesis, which decreases the water potential of the cell.

study.com/academy/lesson/phloem-the-pressure-flow...

Pressure Flow Hypothesis. Now that we've covered sinks and sources, let's look at the pressure flow hypothesis. This model of how phloem works is based on the relationship between sinks and sources.

www.britannica.com/plant/angiosperm/Organization-of-the...

Mass-flow hypotheses include the pressure-flow hypothesis, which states that flow into sieve tubes at source regions (places of photosynthesis or mobilization and exportation of storage products) raises the osmotic pressure in the sieve tube; removal of sugars from sieve tubes in sink regions—i.e., those in which sugars are removed or ...

filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/biology/AQA-7401-7402-TN...

The water enters the xylem and is pulled back up the plant in the transpiration stream. [The mechanism of unloading is complicated by the fact that different sinks within a single plant and different species of plants use different methods: some apoplastic and some symplastic.] Mass flow hypothesis (slide 12)