Marcus Brutus is the tragic hero of Shakespeare's "Tragedy of Julius Caesar" because he embodies Aristotle's elements of a tragic hero: he has a tragic flaw, he experiences a fall from high to low fortune and he is seen ... More »

In the play "Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare, Brutus is described as patriotic, honorable, idealistic, self-controlled and unpractical. These character traits make Brutus the tragic hero of the second part of the p... More »

In the play "Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare, Brutus fits the definition of a tragic hero. Marc Antony describes Brutus as the noblest Roman even after Brutus kills Caesar. Since Brutus did not kill Caesar out of e... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics

In Shakespeare's "Othello," Othello himself is clearly distinguished as the play's tragic hero, owing to his possession of what Aristotle termed a tragic flaw. A tragic flaw is broadly defined as a human vulnerability or... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature

In the play "Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare, Brutus fits the definition of a tragic hero. Marc Antony describes Brutus as the noblest Roman even after Brutus kills Caesar. Since Brutus did not kill Caesar out of e... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics

The plot to assassinate Julius Caesar involved up to 60 men, and the conspiracy was led by Cassius Longinus and Marcus Brutus, Caesar's brother-in-law. Caesar was attacked and stabbed to death on March 15, 44 B.C. as he ... More »

In William Shakespeare's play, "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar," the death of Caius Cassius is an example of situational irony. Cassius is killed with the same sword that he used to kill Caesar, as Cassius points out with ... More »