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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Island_biogeography

Insular biogeography or island biogeography is a field within biogeography that examines the factors that affect the species richness and diversification of isolated natural communities. The theory was originally developed to explain the pattern of the species–area relationship occurring in oceanic islands.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Theory_of_Island_Biogeography

The Theory of Island Biogeography is a 1967 book by Robert MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson. It is widely regarded as a seminal piece in island biogeography and ecology. The Princeton University Press reprinted the book in 2001 as a part of the "Princeton Landmarks in Biology" series.

press.princeton.edu/titles/7051.html

Biogeography was stuck in a "natural history phase" dominated by the collection of data, the young Princeton biologists Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson argued in 1967. In this book, the authors developed a general theory to explain the facts of island biogeography. The theory builds on the ...

biology.kenyon.edu/courses/biol228/slides/bio228_week15.pdf

Robert MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson The Theory of Island Biogeography Extinction balances Immigration Assumptions: Increasing isolation decreases immigration

www.shmoop.com/biogeography/island-biogeography.html

Two scientists, Robert MacArthur and E. O. Wilson, developed a theory to describe island biodiversity. Their theory is called the island equilibrium model. The island equilibrium model describes the number of species on an island based on the immigration and extinction rates of species on that island.

web.stanford.edu/.../text/essays/Island_Biogeography.html

Wilson of Harvard, developed a theory of "island biogeography" to explain such uneven distributions. They proposed that the number of species on any island reflects a balance between the rate at which new species colonize it and the rate at which populations of established species become extinct.

www.islandbiogeography.org

A modified version of the classical island biogeography model proposed by MacArthur and Wilson (1963) is depicted above. The model considers the interaction of two main parameters, colonization and extinction, and then considers island size and distance from mainland as predictors of the species richness found on each island.

books.google.com/books/about/The_Theory_of_Island...

Biogeography was stuck in a "natural history phase" dominated by the collection of data, the young Princeton biologists Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson argued in 1967. In this book, the authors developed a general theory to explain the facts of island biogeography. The theory builds on the first principles of population ecology and genetics to explain how distance and area combi...

quizlet.com/31914613/bio-chapter-41-section-1-flash-cards

Start studying Bio Chapter 41 Section 1. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. ... According to MacArthur and Wilson's hypothesis of island biogeography, species immigration and extinction rates on a particular island correlate to _____.

www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs/rmrs_p021/rmrs_p021_163_171.pdf

The equilibrium theory of island biogeography (ETIB), proposed by MacArthur and Wilson, is a relatively recent development that has sparked a tremendous amount of scientific controversy. Initially introduced to the public in 1963 as “An Equilibrium Theory of Insular Zoogeography,” the idea was expanded in 1967 into a book publication. The