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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Theory_of_Island_Biogeography

The Theory of Island Biogeography is a 1967 book by Robert MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson. It is widely regarded as a seminal piece in island biogeography and ecology.The Princeton University Press reprinted the book in 2001 as a part of the "Princeton Landmarks in Biology" series. The book popularized the theory that insular biota maintain a dynamic equilibrium between immigration and ....

press.princeton.edu/titles/7051.html

Biogeography was stuck in a "natural history phase" dominated by the collection of data, the young Princeton biologists Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson argued in 1967. In this book, the authors developed a general theory to explain the facts of island biogeography. The theory builds on the first principles of population ecology and genetics to explain how distance and area combi...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Island_biogeography

Insular biogeography or island biogeography is a field within biogeography that examines the factors that affect the species richness and diversification of isolated natural communities. The theory was originally developed to explain the pattern of the species–area relationship occurring in oceanic islands.

biology.kenyon.edu/courses/biol228/slides/bio228_week15.pdf

Robert MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson The Theory of Island Biogeography Extinction balances Immigration Assumptions: Increasing isolation decreases immigration rate Increasing size decreases extinction rate . Mountaintops as Islands The Species-Area Relationship

web.stanford.edu/.../text/essays/Island_Biogeography.html

Wilson of Harvard, developed a theory of "island biogeography" to explain such uneven distributions. They proposed that the number of species on any island reflects a balance between the rate at which new species colonize it and the rate at which populations of established species become extinct.

science.sciencemag.org/content/159/3810/71

The Theory of Island Biogeography. Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson. Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J., 1967. 215 pp., illus. Cloth, $8; paper, $3.95.

muse.jhu.edu/book/44254

The authors then test the theory against data. The Theory of Island Biogeography was never intended as the last word on the subject. Instead, MacArthur and Wilson sought to stimulate new forms of theoretical and empirical studies, which will lead in turn to a stronger general theory.

www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt19cc1t2

The Theory of Island Biogeographywas never intended as the last word on the subject. Instead, MacArthur and Wilson sought to stimulate new forms of theoretical and empirical studies, which will lead in turn to a stronger general theory. Even a third of a century since its publication, the book continues to serve that purpose well.

onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1365-2699.2008...

The theory of island biogeography, first outlined by Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson in 1963 in the journal Evolution, and later developed in their 1967 Princeton monograph, has a clear claim to be the most influential body of theory within ecological biogeography. It is based on fundamental dynamic processes operating on populations ...

books.google.com/books/about/The_Theory_of_Island...

Biogeography was stuck in a "natural history phase" dominated by the collection of data, the young Princeton biologists Robert H. MacArthur and Edward O. Wilson argued in 1967. In this book, the authors developed a general theory to explain the facts of island biogeography. The theory builds on the first principles of population ecology and genetics to explain how distance and area combi...