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www.reference.com/article/levers-work-180721df122af2f9

HowStuffWorks explains that levers work by reducing the force needed to move weights. They achieve this by increasing the distance through which the required force acts. For instance, a 1-kilogram force that acts through a distance of 3 meters is capable of moving a 3-k...

www.reference.com/article/make-lever-42fa10506d473cab

A lever is a simple machine, and it only consists of two material components and two work components. A lever can be made with a beam, or solid rod; a fulcrum, or pivot point; an input force, or effort; and an output force, or load or resistance.

www.reference.com/article/people-use-levers-6a4900536e15b844

A lever is a basic machine people use to move a load around a pivot by applying force. Many common tools, such as scissors, pliers and tongs are types of levers.

www.reference.com/article/example-lever-65d430afcd009c32

An common example of a lever is a see-saw. Some other levers are pliers, crowbars, wheelbarrows, scissors, staplers, fishing rods, tweezers, nut crackers and fishing rods.

www.reference.com/article/different-types-levers-24a869a09c5d0414

Levers are denominated as being either first-class, second-class or third-class levers. A lever is classified based on the position of the fulcrum in relation to the point of effort and the load. The fulcrum is the pivot point of a lever.

www.reference.com/article/class-2-lever-6c38c6b26b8d97eb

A class 2 lever is a lever with the fulcrum or joint at one end, with the load that is being carried in the middle. The effort, which is the object lifting or pulling the lever, is at the opposite end from the fulcrum.

www.reference.com/article/first-class-lever-39dab9e44d502ea4

A first-class lever is a beam, rod or stick with the load at one end, the fulcrum in the middle and the force applied on the other end. A good example of a first-class lever is a child's see-saw.