If the offending jellyfish lives in nontropical waters, treat a sting by using seawater to wash the area and deactivate the stinging cells left behind. For stings in tropical waters, WebMD recommends using vinegar as a r... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases

Jellyfish do not have brains, and most barely have nervous systems. They have primitive nerve cells that help them orient themselves in the water and sense light and touch. Jellyfish can be tiny or grow to several feet i... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Marine Life Jellyfish

Jellyfish primarily eat plankton, which are organisms that lack the strength and size to swim and therefore drift in marine and freshwater currents. Larger species of jellyfish also eat crustaceans, fish and other jellyf... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Marine Life Jellyfish

Treatment for a jellyfish sting includes rinsing the area with seawater or a solution of salt water. With some types of stings, soaking the affected area in vinegar mixed with an equal amount of water helps to relieve th... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Marine Life Jellyfish

The best first aid for a bee sting, according to WebMD, includes removing the stinger, washing the area with soap and water, applying a cold compress to ease swelling and administering ibuprofen or acetaminophen for pain... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Wounds & Bruises

If a person suspects he has a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, photographing the area is not a required step in seeking treatment, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Instea... More »

The most common symptom of a hernia is the formation of a lump on the affected area, and hernia treatment involves covering the hole with surgical mesh, according to Healthline. Some cases are difficult to identify. The ... More »

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