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www.history.com/news/st-patricks-day-myths-debunked

Before you celebrate St. Patrick’s Day this weekend, get your facts straight by exploring common misconceptions about the holiday. Though one of Ireland’s patron saints, Patrick was born in ...

randazza.wordpress.com/2014/03/17/was-saint-patrick-really-italian

Instead, we celebrated St. Joseph’s day on March 19. Of course, every St. Joseph’s Day, someone would bring up the old story that St. Patrick’s day should be “our” day too — since St. Patrick was really Italian. We wanted to believe it, so we did. Every year, articles pop up

www.livinglanguage.com/.../09/the-mystery-of-st-patrick-was-he-really-from-ireland

The Mystery of St. Patrick – Was He Really From Ireland Posted on March 9, 2012 by Living Language St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is one of the world’s most recognizable saints.

italoamericano.org/story/2015-3-16/Saint-Patrick

A “St. Patrick was Italian” remark, tossed into your March conversations, can ignite boring talk into boiling talk if you have some conversational fodder handy, to buttress your claim: The first St. Patrick’s Day in the U.S. was held in Boston in 1734.

www.northjersey.com/.../03/12/st-patricks-day-who-st-patrick-he-italian/415902002

But was St. Patrick Italian? L’Italo-Americano, the biweekly Italian-American organization established in 1908, insists on its website italoamericano.org that Patrick was, indeed, a paisan.

www.irishcentral.com/opinion/others/italians-reclaim-st-patricks-day

Transitioning St. Patrick's Day to the Italians might change the complexion of the holiday just a teensy.. Read more: The special love-hate relationship between Irish and Italian Americans. If the ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Patrick

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randazza.wordpress.com/2015/03/16/was-st-patrick-really-italian-2

Every year, articles pop up repeating the story that St. Patrick was really Italian. Even GoErie.com repeats the tale. St. Patrick was born around 432 AD and died around 461 AD. He was Italian not Irish. Story is that St. Patrick was kidnapped at age 16 from Rome and brought to Ireland as a slave.

nowthatsitalian.wordpress.com/2012/03/17/st-patrick-was-italian

The first St. Patrick’s Day in the U.S. was held in Boston in 1734. By stretching things a bit, you can correctly state that “St. Patrick was Italian.” Patrick’s parents were Romans. The Romans ruled England at that time. Calpurnius, Patrick’s father, was a high Roman diplomat living in England, but a Roman citizen.

churchpop.com/2019/03/14/what-was-st-patricks-real-name-the-fascinating...

Did you know St. Patrick’s name actually wasn’t Patrick? In a recent episode of The Catholic Talk Show, Ryan DellaCrosse, Ryan Scheel, and Fr. Rich Pagano discuss the fascinating history behind the amazing St. Patrick!. Scheel reveals that St. Patrick’s birth name was actually Maewyn Succat. He wasn’t even really Irish–he was Roman-British!