Web Results

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchy_of_Australia

Australia is governed under a form of constitutional monarchy, largely modelled on the Westminster system of parliamentary government, while incorporating features unique to the Constitution of Australia. The present monarch is Elizabeth II, styled Queen of Australia, who has reigned since 6 February 1952.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia–United_Kingdom_relations

Australia–United Kingdom relations, also referred to as Anglo–Australian relations, are the relations between the commonwealth realms of Australia and the United Kingdom, marked by historical, cultural, institutional and language ties, extensive people-to-people links, aligned security interests, sporting tournaments (notably The Ashes), and significant trade and investment co-operation.

www.quora.com/How-is-Australia-governed

Elizabeth II of England etc is also the Queen of Australia. In Australia, the Queen is represented by the Governor-general (who is essentially a figurehead). As a matter of fact, Australia is an independent parliamentary democracy, a federation of six States (and some territories), with two Houses of Parliament and a Prime Minister who is the ...

answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080730023339AAlUDXH

Australia and Great Britain are on opposite sides of the earth so Australia cannot be part of Great Britain. If what you are alluding to is what links them and Canada together it is the Commonwealth. The Commonwealth is made up of all the countries that were British colonies but now are independent nations that shared a common history or bond.

www.answers.com/Q/Is_Australia_governed_by_Britain_in_any_way

Yes and no. Australia is no longer governed by Britain in reality in any way.Technically, Australia is ruled by the British monarchy, even though that monarchy does not have any right to interfere ...

www.australias.guide/australia-government

The Constitution vests the executive powers of government in a Governor-General representing Queen Elizabeth II of England (also the Queen of Australia), but they are exercised by tradition on behalf of the elected government. Only once, in 1975, has the Governor-General dismissed an elected national government.

history.stackexchange.com/questions/1785/why-did-canada...

Canada, Australia, and New Zealand were all British territories, yes. While I do not know the answer to this question, I do believe that "financial reasons" played a role. Do keep in mind there is a vast distance between those colonies and the British holdings of Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales.

www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/House_of_Representatives/...

the australian system of government Australia is a federation of six States which, together with two self-governing Territories, have their own constitutions, parliaments, governments and laws. This Infosheet is about the national or central government, usually called the Federal Government or the Commonwealth Government.

www.racismnoway.com.au/.../australias-cultural-diversity

Australia has a unique history that has shaped the diversity of its peoples, their cultures and lifestyles today. Three major contributors to Australia’s demographic make-up are a diverse Indigenous population, a British colonial past and extensive immigration from many different countries and cultures.

www.answers.com/Q/How_is_Britain_governed

Today then Britain is governed by parliament if you live in England and also by a regional assembly if you live in Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland. ... Australia has this relationship with ...