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www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=anatomy-of...

There are 2 fontanelles (the space between the bones of an infant's skull where the sutures intersect) that are covered by tough membranes that protect the underlying soft tissues and brain. The fontanelles include: Anterior fontanelle (also called soft spot).

www.webmd.com/baby/interactive-pregnancy-tool-fetal...

Take a peek inside the womb to see how your belly and your baby develop from week to week with this interactive visual pregnancy timeline from WebMD.

www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/craniosynostosis.html

These sutures allow the skull to grow as the baby’s brain grows. Around two years of age, a child’s skull bones begin to join together because the sutures become bone. When this occurs, the suture is said to “close.” In a baby with craniosynostosis, one or more of the sutures closes too early.

www.healthline.com/health/sutures-separated

Separated sutures are large, atypical gaps in the skull of an infant. A young child’s head is composed of six bony plates that fuse together as the child ages. The edges of the plates are ...

www.seattlechildrens.org/conditions/bone-joint-muscle...

This diagram shows the sutures most often affected. Craniosynostosis of the sagittal suture is the most common type. When these seams close (fuse) too early, it changes the shape of baby's skull and it can't grow right. This can increase pressure in the skull and hurt brain development. A baby can have 1 or more fused sutures.

medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002320.htm

The sutures and fontanelles are needed for the infant's brain growth and development. During childbirth, the flexibility of the sutures allows the bones to overlap so the baby's head can pass through the birth canal without pressing on and damaging their brain. During infancy and childhood, the sutures are flexible.

www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/craniosynostosis/...

Cranial sutures and fontanels. Joints called cranial sutures, made of strong, fibrous tissue, hold the bones of your baby's skull together until the bones fuse, normally around age 2. Until then, the sutures intersect at the fontanels, the soft spots on your baby's head. The largest of the four fontanels is at the front of the skull (anterior).

www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/craniosynostosis/...

Cranial sutures and fontanels. Joints called cranial sutures, made of strong, fibrous tissue, hold the bones of your baby's skull together until the bones fuse, normally around age 2. Until then, the sutures intersect at the fontanels, the soft spots on your baby's head. The largest of the four fontanels is at the front of the skull (anterior).

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cranial_Stenosis

Craniosynostosis is a condition in which one or more of the fibrous sutures in an infant (very young) skull prematurely fuses by turning into bone (ossification), thereby changing the growth pattern of the skull. Because the skull cannot expand perpendicular to the fused suture, it compensates by growing more in the direction parallel to the closed sutures.

medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001590.htm

Craniosynostosis is a birth defect in which one or more sutures on a baby's head closes earlier than usual. The skull of an infant or young child is made up of bony plates that are still growing. The borders at which these plates intersect are called sutures or suture lines. The sutures allow for growth of the skull.