Inelastic collisions are collisions where the kinetic energy is not conserved during the incident, but the total energy and momentum is conserved. For example, when a car collides with an immovable object, it is stopped,... More »

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An inelastic collision occurs when two objects collide and remain together after the collision. They end with a common final velocity. Kinetic energy is not conserved and momentum is conserved. More »

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The equation for perfectly inelastic collisions is m1(v1) + m2(v2) = (m1 + m2)vf. Object one has a mass of m1 and an initial velocity of v1. The mass of object two is m2, and the initial velocity of it is v2. The final v... More »

The equation for perfectly inelastic collisions is m1(v1) + m2(v2) = (m1 + m2)vf. Object one has a mass of m1 and an initial velocity of v1. The mass of object two is m2, and the initial velocity of it is v2. The final v... More »

Bouncy balls bounce high because the material of the ball is extremely elastic and can convert the kinetic energy from the fall into potential energy and back again with very little loss in momentum. Bouncy balls are use... More »

Inelastic collisions are collisions between objects that do not conserve kinetic energy but do conserve momentum. They often occur between various molecules during chemical reactions. More »

Entropy is seen in situations that involve the dispersal of energy from a concentrated state to a less concentrated one, such as a hot pan cooling down, a tire blowing and releasing its air, the rusting of metal or cream... More »