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www.reference.com/article/chinese-language-use-symbols-words-faac581711e5b64

All Chinese languages use symbols, or "characters," for written communication. Originally, characters were pictures of the things they represented. In later versions one may notice similarities; however, as the language developed, characters became more and more abstrac...

www.reference.com/article/chinese-birth-symbols-mean-707b30a14db160cc

Chinese birth symbols are said to have a great deal of influence on a person's qualities and potential romantic partners. For example, a person born under the Rat birth sign is said to be intelligent, charming and outgoing, and also compatible with those born under the ...

www.reference.com/article/examples-chinese-symbols-meanings-38bb8c2a56d85125

Examples of Chinese symbols include foo dogs, dragons, and the yin and yang circle. Foo dogs, which are actually lions, were placed as sentries outside of the palaces and homes of the Chinese aristocracy to let visitors know they were entering a place of importance.

www.reference.com/article/symbols-chinese-alphabet-e3e3c59c2f438b9

Unlike English, the standard unit of pronunciation in Chinese is the syllable; there are 413 in common use, and these syllables combine to create thousands of words. Chinese words are made up of one, two or more characters, representing one, two or more syllables. Sylla...

www.reference.com/article/important-symbol-chinese-legalism-bdfbcbc06c4bcab

The most important symbol of Chinese legalism is the Great Wall of China. Built during the third century by the Ch'in emperor known as First August Supreme Ruler or Shish Huang-ti, the wall represented the rule of law, according to the International World History Projec...

www.reference.com/article/chinese-lanterns-symbolize-92f5b1cebfae8697

There are many myths to explain the origin of the Chinese lanterns, but one that sticks out the most is that they represent Buddha's power to dispel darkness. The story goes that during the first century, Emperor Mingdi sent a scholar to India for Buddhist scriptures an...

www.reference.com/article/dragon-symbolize-chinese-culture-80192dd441b5a043

In Chinese culture, the dragon symbolizes excellence, boldness, perseverance, divinity, power, valiancy, heroism and nobility. The dragon continues to overcome until he finds success. He is decisive, intelligent, energetic, optimistic and ambitious.