https://neuro.hms.harvard.edu/harvard-mahoney-neuroscience-institute/brain-newsletter/and-brain-series/sugar-and-brain

If there isn't enough glucose in the brain, for example, neurotransmitters, the brain's ... such as learning and visual perceptions of spatial relationships, improve.

https://www.livescience.com/3186-brain-food-eat-smart.html

Jan 7, 2009 ... The brain works best with about 25 grams of glucose circulating in the blood ... The increased likelihood of strokes is just one acute example.

https://www.eufic.org/en/whats-in-food/article/glucose-and-mental-performance

Glucose is a type of sugar which the brain depends on for fuel. Learn how to keep your blood glucose levels at an optimum level for good mental performance .

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3900881/

Glucose metabolism provides the fuel for physiological brain function through the ... In essence, the brain increases its utilization of glucose upon activation [13].

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/315571.php

Jan 31, 2017 ... Our brain runs on sugar, and new research links the lack of glucose with ... associated with an increased severity of Alzheimer's and dementia.

http://blog.insidetracker.com/how-to-improve-your-mind-and-body-with-insidetracker

Dec 1, 2015 ... The baggage of fasting glucose is that many believe it's about preventing diabetes only, rather than improving your mind and body.

https://www.verywellmind.com/how-sugar-affects-the-brain-4065218

Nov 24, 2018 ... In the brain, excess sugar impairs both our cognitive skills and our .... 10 Strategies to Boost Your Cognitive Health and Fight Brain Aging.

https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/blood-sugar-low.html

Our brains depend on glucose to function, even when we're sleeping. ... Also, some things may increase how quickly insulin gets absorbed into the bloodstream ...

https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/103/1/221/4565492

Twelve weeks of HIIT was sufficient to increase glucose uptake in select regions of the brain in younger and older adults.

http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/66/7/1758

Together, these observations raise the possibility that although the brain can affect glucose homeostasis, day-to-day control of blood glucose levels does not ...