Water evaporates because individual water molecules break free of the bonds that hold them all together as a liquid. While water evaporates more in heat, it is possible for it to evaporate in cold conditions. More »

Water evaporates when molecules at the interface of water and air have enough energy to escape the forces that hold them together in the liquid. Evaporation, along with boiling, is a type of vaporization. More »

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Around 3 trillion tons of ocean water is evaporated each day, much of it from the heat of the sun. The rate at which water evaporates depends on several factors. More »

Water evaporates when molecules at the interface of water and air have enough energy to escape the forces that hold them together in the liquid. Evaporation, along with boiling, is a type of vaporization. More »

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Water molecules break bonds and insert themselves between sugar molecules, causing sugar cubes to dissolve in water. The positively charged oxygen ions in water combine with the negatively charged hydroxyl groups in suga... More »

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Water begins to evaporate whenever its molecules speed up enough to break free from their bonds. A water molecule, or H20, is made of two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. More »

Alcohols, such as ethanol and methanol, evaporate at a rate similar to other compounds of their type, but water evaporates comparatively slowly because of its strong bonds. Water molecules easily form hydrogen bonds with... More »