Straight line depreciation is equal to the cost of something minus the salvage value of the item divided by the life in number of periods of the item. This method allows the depreciation of an asset to be charged in a co... More »

www.reference.com Science Measurements

Calculating depreciation depends on the item you are depreciating, and whether you want to calculate by time or by use. Three methods of calculating depreciation exist: the declining balance method, the straight line met... More »

Depreciation expenses are calculated by dividing the cost of an asset by the number of years a company expects to own it, explains CPA Mike Piper for The Oblivious Investor. Straight-line depreciation calculates the depr... More »

www.reference.com Business & Finance Financial Calculations

Recoverable depreciation is the difference between the replacement cost of an insured item and its actual cash value. Recoverable depreciation is used in replacement cost insurance policies, which means that the insuranc... More »

www.reference.com Business & Finance Insurance

According to the Internal Revenue Service, fair market value can be calculated based on the current selling price of the property, the price of comparable goods, the cost to replace the item or the opinion of experts on ... More »

Calculating depreciation depends on the item you are depreciating, and whether you want to calculate by time or by use. Three methods of calculating depreciation exist: the declining balance method, the straight line met... More »

The gradient of a line (m) is calculated by finding the quotient of vertical displacement (y2 minus y1) over horizontal displacement (x2 minus x1). This means that the slope is equal to the vertical change divided by the... More »