The sun is approximately 4.6 billion years old. It was formed when part of an immense molecular cloud underwent a gravitational collapse. The sun is a ball of gas, consisting of 92.1 percent hydrogen and 7.8 percent heli... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Our Sun

The word sun comes from the Old English word "sunne," which derives from the Proto-Germanic word "sunnon." There are many cognates in other languages such as the Dutch word "zon" and the German "sonne," but no one knows ... More »

The sun can be described as a yellow dwarf star, about 4.5 billion years old and halfway through its life cycle. Situated at the center of Earth's solar system, the sun is an almost spherical ball of hot plasma with a di... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Our Sun

Scientists expect the sun to burn for another 5 billion years. However, just because the sun continues to burn does not mean that Earth necessarily remains habitable. More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Our Sun

The sun can be described as a yellow dwarf star, about 4.5 billion years old and halfway through its life cycle. Situated at the center of Earth's solar system, the sun is an almost spherical ball of hot plasma with a di... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Our Sun

Heliologists predict the sun will last for at least another five billion years. The sun has lasted as long as it has because it acts as a nuclear reactor that turns hydrogen into helium. More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Our Sun

The sun does not have any moons. Located at the center of the solar system, the sun is a star that consists mainly of hydrogen and helium. According to NASA, the temperature at the core of the sun can reach as high as 27... More »