The exact number of stars in the universe is not known, and the total figure might be unknowable from the Earth's position in space. The universe almost certainly contains no fewer than 10^24, or 1 septillion, stars, and... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Stellar Astronomy

While the exact number of stars in the universe is unknown, astronomers estimate that there are at least 100 billion stars in each of the 10 trillion galaxies. However, new galaxies are discovered often. More »

The largest identified star in the known universe is VY Canis Majoris, a hypergiant of the constellation Canis Major, calculated to be more than 1,540 times larger than the sun. YV Canis Majoris is situated 5,000 light y... More »

While the exact number of stars in the universe is unknown, astronomers estimate that there are at least 100 billion stars in each of the 10 trillion galaxies. However, new galaxies are discovered often. More »

The observable universe contains an estimated 6.8 x 10^24, or 6.8 septillion, stars. To reach this estimate, astronomers conducted an exhaustive inventory of the stars in the Milky Way galaxy, made reasonable inferences ... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Stellar Astronomy

The universe has been known to be expanding since 1929, when Edwin Hubble measured the speed at which distant galaxies appear to be receding from Earth's position in space. In the early 21st century, astronomers measured... More »

www.reference.com Science Astronomy Universe

A circumpolar star is so close to one of Earth's two poles that instead of rising and setting like other stars, it seems only to revolve around one point in the sky. This effect is caused by Earth's rotation on its axis ... More »