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www.energy.gov/eere/water/how-hydropower-works

Hydropower uses a fuel—water—that is not reduced or used up in the process. Because the water cycle is an endless, constantly recharging system, hydropower is considered a renewable energy. When flowing water is captured and turned into electricity, it is called hydroelectric power or hydropower.

www.wvic.com/Content/How_Hydropower_Works.cfm

How Hydropower Works. Hydropower plants capture the energy of falling water to generate electricity. A turbine converts the kinetic energy of falling water into mechanical energy. Then a generator converts the mechanical energy from the turbine into electrical energy.

www.usgs.gov/.../water-science-school/science/hydroelectric-power-how-it-works

As to how this generator works, the Corps of Engineers explains it this way: "A hydraulic turbine converts the energy of flowing water into mechanical energy. A hydroelectric generator converts this mechanical energy into electricity. The operation of a generator is based on the principles discovered by Faraday.

www.studentenergy.org/topics/hydro-power

Hydropower or hydroelectricity refers to the conversion of energy from flowing water into electricity. Hydro Power. Definition. Hydropower or hydroelectricity refers to the conversion of energy from flowing water into electricity.It is considered a renewable energy source because the water cycle is constantly renewed by the sun.. Historically, one of the first uses of hydro power was for ...

www.ucsusa.org/resources/how-hydroelectric-energy-works

Hydropower can also be generated without a dam, through a process known as run-of-the-river. In this case, the volume and speed of water is not augmented by a dam. Instead, a run-of-river project spins the turbine blades by capturing the kinetic energy of the moving water in the river. Hydropower projects that have dams can control when ...

www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/hydropower

How hydropower works. A typical hydroelectric plant is a system with three parts: a power plant where the electricity is produced, a dam that can be opened or closed to control water flow, and a ...

www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/hydroelectric-energy

Hydroelectric energy, also called hydroelectric power or hydroelectricity, is a form of energy that harnesses the power of water in motion—such as water flowing over a waterfall—to generate electricity.People have used this force for millennia. Over two thousand years ago, people in Greece used flowing water to turn the wheel of their mill to ground wheat into flour.

science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/hydropower-plant1.htm

Dam - Most hydropower plants rely on a dam that holds back water, creating a large reservoir.Often, this reservoir is used as a recreational lake, such as Lake Roosevelt at the Grand Coulee Dam in Washington State.; Intake - Gates on the dam open and gravity pulls the water through the penstock, a pipeline that leads to the turbine.Water builds up pressure as it flows through this pipe.

esub.com/how-does-hydroelectric-energy-work

Hydroelectric power generation has many unique advantages that make it a desirable method of energy production. Firstly, it is highly flexible. Power stations take just minutes to power up and begin filling a demand for energy. When there is a surplus of power available, it is quick and inexpensive to power down a hydroelectric dam and stop ...

science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/hydropower-plant.htm

Worldwide, hydropower plants produce about 24 percent of the world's electricity and supply more than 1 billion people with power. The world's hydropower plants output a combined total of 675,000 megawatts, the energy equivalent of 3.6 billion barrels of oil, according to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.There are more than 2,000 hydropower plants operating in the United States, ma...