Much like humans, dolphins primarily use sound to convey information to one another. The sound is described as "whistling" by the Dolphin Research Center. Dolphins use visual cues and body language to communicate althoug... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Mammals Marine Mammals

Whales and dolphins communicate underwater by making different sounds that include chirps, clicks, barks, moans, yaps, squeaks, mews and whistles. It is not known whether dolphins and whales communicate with one another ... More »

Dolphins communicate vocally through a series of high-pitched clicks and whistles. Dolphins are also thought to employ body language, physical communication and a process known as echolocation in order to communicate wit... More »

Sharks, killer whales and humans are the primary eaters of dolphins. Dolphins are near the top of the food chain and employ many defensive strategies, so they are not often eaten by predators. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Mammals Marine Mammals

Whales and dolphins communicate underwater by making different sounds that include chirps, clicks, barks, moans, yaps, squeaks, mews and whistles. It is not known whether dolphins and whales communicate with one another ... More »

Dolphins sleep by a process called unihemispheric slow-wave sleep. This kind of sleep is believed to help dolphins and other creatures recover from their daily activities. More »

Dolphins grow to different sizes, with the bottlenose dolphin growing to be approximately 10 to 14 feet and weighing 1,100 lbs. while the orca whale grows to approximately 21 to 23 feet long and weights in at 6 to 10 ton... More »