Muck fires start when a surface fire burns down into loose organic material. The material that makes up the smoldering embers can start a blaze long after the original fire has burned out. Muck fires spread underground a... More »

www.reference.com Science Earth Science

Muck fires result when the loose, organic material found below the top layer of soil ignites and produces a sub-surface fire that can burn for weeks and reach temperatures of more than 500 degrees Fahrenheit. In addition... More »

Muck fires often occur during times of drought, when water tables are low, and as the result of a forest fire. The heat from above causes the loosely packed layer of peat, located below the soil, to catch fire. Oxygen se... More »

www.reference.com Science Earth Science Landforms

Muck fires result when the loose, organic material found below the top layer of soil ignites and produces a sub-surface fire that can burn for weeks and reach temperatures of more than 500 degrees Fahrenheit. In addition... More »

Muck fires often occur during times of drought, when water tables are low, and as the result of a forest fire. The heat from above causes the loosely packed layer of peat, located below the soil, to catch fire. Oxygen se... More »

www.reference.com Science Earth Science Landforms

Tundra fires tend to occur naturally in the area, but climate change may also contribute to the greater intensity of recent phenomena. University of Illinois plant biology professor Feng Sheng Hu claims a dramatic, nonli... More »

Tar is a derivative of a variety of organic material, commonly consisting of small animals and plants, decomposed by high temperatures and limited exposure to oxygen. This process is referred to as destructive distillati... More »