Although hermit crabs must keep their gills moist in order to be able to breathe, they cannot breathe underwater. In fact, they will die if they are submerged in water because their gills will not provide the oxygen they... More »

Some of the most important and interesting adaptations the hermit crab have developed is its diligent exploration and occupation of gastropod shells. Unlike other crustaceans, the hermit crab does not have its own shell.... More »

The vast majority of crabs have gills, much like fish, which extract oxygen dissolved in water. Even when they are on land, the gills can still absorb oxygen as long as they are kept moist. There is also a small selectio... More »

The vast majority of crabs have gills, much like fish, which extract oxygen dissolved in water. Even when they are on land, the gills can still absorb oxygen as long as they are kept moist. There is also a small selectio... More »

Hermit crabs go through periods of highly sluggish activity, or even inactivity, referred to as molting. During molting, hermit crabs develop a new exoskeleton and shed their old exoskeleton. More »

Hermit crabs are popular pets that are fairly easy to care for as long as attention is paid to detail. Appropriate environmental factors are vital for their well-being, so be sure to set up their aquarium properly, using... More »

Hermit crabs molt, or shed their skin, once a year as a part of their regular growth cycle. During the molting process, a hermit crab may bury itself in the gravel or sand and stay there for a few weeks to shed its exosk... More »

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