Atoms form chemical bonds because they are seeking out stability. Atoms have free electrons known as valence electrons in their outermost orbital that create unbalanced charges and cause them to be reactive and unstable.... More »

The biggest factors in determining if atoms will bond are their respective electronegativities and stability. Atoms are more likely to adopt a more stable configuration with another atom, which is expressed as bonding. T... More »

When chemical bonds in reacting molecules are broken during metabolism, energy is required, whereas chemical bonds in reacting molecules that form during metabolism will actually exert energy. During metabolism, the rela... More »

The stability of carbocations is affected by neighboring carbon atoms, neighboring lone pairs and carbon-carbon multiple bonds. When a carbon atom forms a bond with three carbon atoms, it results in carbocation. More »

Unstable atoms gain stability by transforming into different nuclides and gradually decaying until the nucleus is balanced, explains the Environmental Protection Agency. This can take a number of different transformation... More »

The biggest factors in determining if atoms will bond are their respective electronegativities and stability. Atoms are more likely to adopt a more stable configuration with another atom, which is expressed as bonding. T... More »

Covalent bonds form when atoms share their valence electrons with other atoms to become a more stable molecule. Atoms share their electrons in order to completely fill up their outer-most layer — the valence shell. Two a... More »