There are two sets of muscles that help annelids move. One expands, and the other contracts the body. Annelids alternate the use of these muscles to achieve locomotion. More »

The diet of an annelid varies depending on the type of worm. Many earthworms and freshwater worms, also known as oligochaetes, consume organic matter in soil. Some aquatic oligochaetes feed on small invertebrates. More »

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Cnidarians that move do so by flexing weak, gelatinous muscles in the body walls of their bells against a pressurized hydrostatic skeleton. However, many types of cnidarians, such as mature anemones and corals, move litt... More »

The diet of an annelid varies depending on the type of worm. Many earthworms and freshwater worms, also known as oligochaetes, consume organic matter in soil. Some aquatic oligochaetes feed on small invertebrates. More »

www.reference.com Science Biology Zoology

Annelids and arthropods are similar in that they are both relatively small invertebrate animals with strong and obvious body segmentation, circulatory systems and a one-way gut. Scientists think annelids and arthropods s... More »

Annelids, formerly called annelida, have a closed circulatory system. There are some small annelids that do not have a separate circulatory system, but most annelids have a well-developed closed circulatory system. More »

The advantages of exoskeletons include enhanced leverage for muscular movements and protective covering for muscles and internal organs, while their disadvantages include heightened vulnerability during the molting proce... More »