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marty-green.blogspot.com/2012/12/how-does-lemon-battery-work.html

This reaction works for the fully-developed zinc-copper cell with the copper strip immersed in copper sulfate solution, and the zinc strip immersed in zinc sulfate solution, and the two solutions linked by the "salt bridge". It really doesn't explain the lemon battery.

study.com/academy/lesson/potato-light-bulb-experiment.html

Before we explain how the potato acts as a battery, let's go over the parts of a regular battery you might find in your television remote. Batteries are made of three main parts: an anode, a ...

www.teachengineering.org/activities/view/cub_energy2_lesson04_activity2

Label the battery (voltage) and the resistance (light bulb). Draw an arrow to show the current flow (from the copper end to the zinc end). List two cool products that an engineer could develop that run off a fruit battery. Troubleshooting Tips If the LED clock, light or small light bulbs do not work, check the setup of the potato battery.

www.allaboutcircuits.com/textbook/experiments/chpt-3/potato-battery

One large potato One lemon (optional) Strip of zinc, or galvanized metal Piece of thick copper wire The basic experiment is based on the use of a potato, but many fruits and vegetables work as potential batteries! For the zinc electrode, a large galvanized nail works well. Nails with a thick, rough ...

www.vedantu.com/physics/how-to-make-a-potato-clock

How does the Potato Clock Work? The potato battery is an electrochemical battery, commonly referred to as an electrochemical cell. An electrochemical cell is a cell in which chemical energy is converted to electrical energy by spontaneous electron transfer. In the case of potatoes, the zinc in the nail reacts with the copper wire.

www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Potato-Clock

You can use this potato battery to power a clock for a short time for a science project or just for fun. The makeup of the potato conducts electricity, but keeps the zinc ions in the nail and the copper ions apart, forcing the electrons to move from one to the other, which generates an electrical current.

www.reference.com/science/lemon-battery-work-70146a0948b07e0d

A lemon battery uses the juice inside the lemon as an electrolyte to facilitate electrons moving between a pair of electrodes inserted into the fruit. These need to be two dissimilar metals, such as a copper penny and zinc-coated nail.

www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/a-potato-battery-can-light-up-a-room-for...

The potato battery kit, which includes two metal electrodes and alligator clips, is easy to assemble and, some parts, such as the zinc cathode, can be inexpensively replaced.

www.slideshare.net/WinsNinan/how-potato-batteries-work

How the Potato Clock works 2. A potato battery is an electrochemical battery, otherwise known as an electrochemical cell. An electrochemical cell is a cell in which chemical energy is converted to electric energy by a spontaneous electron transfer. In the case of the potato, the zinc in the nail reacts with the copper wire.

www4.hcmut.edu.vn/~huynhqlinh/olympicvl/tailieu/physlink_askexpert/ae516.cfm.htm

A potato works well, but a tomato, lemon or other citrus fruit can be substituted. The zinc and the copper are the anode and cathode terminals of your potato battery. Using ordinary hook-up electrical wire, you can use the potato to create a voltaic cell, which will power a VERY small bulb. A light emitting diode (LED) will work fine.