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themedicalbiochemistrypage.org/ethanol-alcohol-metabolism-acute-and-chronic...

Chronic ethanol consumption and alcohol metabolism also negatively affects several other metabolic pathways, thereby contributing to the spectrum of metabolic disorders frequently found in alcoholics. These disorders include fatty liver syndromes such as NAFLD and NASH, hyperlipidemia, lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis, and hyperuricemia.

www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/ethanol-metabolism

Ethanol metabolism is regulated by the reactions catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system, and catalase (CAT), which oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) then oxidizes acetaldehyde to acetate (Fig. 51.2).The predominant route for metabolism of ethanol is through the hepatic ADH enzyme system, which oxidizes ethanol to ...

chemistry.elmhurst.edu/vchembook/642alcoholmet.html

Alcohol Metabolism Effects. Introduction: Alcohol is the favorite mood-altering drug in the United States and its effects, both pleasant and unpleasant, are well-known. What may not be well known is the fact that alcohol is a toxic drug that produces pathological changes (cirrhosis) in liver tissue and can cause death. ...

joinclubsoda.com/alcohol-metabolism-effects-drinking

How alcohol affects our metabolism. Our bodies cannot store alcohol. When we drink it, it is quickly absorbed through our small intestines and ends up in our bloodstream. Because it cannot be stored for later use, unlike fats and sugars, it goes to the front of the queue to be dealt with by our livers. Effectively, drinking alcohol puts every ...

sites.tufts.edu/alcoholmetabolism/history

When alcohol, in the form of ethanol, is consumed, the majority enters the systemic circulation where it can then be metabolized in the liver via the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH).

shop.ucsc.edu/alcohol-other-drugs/alcohol/your-body.html

Alcohol is metabolized by the liver, where enzymes break down the alcohol. Understanding the rate of metabolism is critical to understanding the effects of alcohol. In general, the liver can process one ounce of liquor (or one standard drink) in one hour. If you consume more than this, your system becomes saturated, and the additional alcohol ...

sites.tufts.edu/alcoholmetabolism/the-biological-pathway/cytochrome-p450-2e1

With increasing blood alcohol concentration, a secondary pathway for ethanol metabolism kicks in using the microsomal cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2E1 ().When the ethanol concentration is low, CYP2E1 is only responsible for oxidizing around 10% of the ethanol, but as the blood alcohol concentration increases, so does the activity of CYP2E1 in metabolizing ethanol.

www.mindbodygreen.com/articles/is-alcohol-sabotaging-your-metabolism

The truth about alcohol and your metabolism. First, let's break down what alcohol does to you from a biological standpoint. Alcohol has long been demonized as a muscle inhibitor, as it blocks the absorption of nutrients to the parts of your body that need them.

sites.duke.edu/apep/module-1-gender-matters/content/content-how-is-alcohol...

Alcohol that is not metabolized on its first passage through the liver continues to circulate throughout the body as an active drug. Ultimately, only a small fraction of the ingested alcohol escapes metabolism. This small amount of alcohol (5-10%) is eliminated unchanged in the breath as vapor or in the urine.

www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/sleep-newzzz/201801/alcohol-and-sleep-what-you...

As alcohol is metabolized and any of its sedative effects dissipate, the body undergoes what scientists call a “rebound effect.” This includes a move from deeper to lighter sleep, with more ...