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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_democracy

A democracy is a political system, or a system of decision-making within an institution or organization or a country, in which all members have an equal share of power. Modern democracies are characterized by two capabilities that differentiate them fundamentally from earlier forms of government: the capacity to intervene in their own societies and the recognition of their sovereignty by an ...

www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/the-real...

The dawn of American democracy didn’t come in 1776, with the Declaration of Independence. It didn’t come in 1788, when the Constitution was ratified by the states, or in 1789, when George ...

www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?ParagraphID=mzs

The Constitution of the United States of America, adopted in 1788, provides the world's first formal blueprint for a modern democracy. In the first flush of the new nation's enthusiasm, the compromises inherent in normal democracy are not required. George Washington is elected unopposed as president in 1789, and again for a second term in 1792.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democracy

On the American frontier, democracy became a way of life, with more widespread social, economic and political equality. Although not described as a democracy by the founding fathers, they shared a determination to root the American experiment in the principles of natural freedom and equality.

www.ushistory.org/gov/1c.asp

The ancient Romans had a working democracy for the early part of their history. The Forum in Rome is where political meetings and votes were held. The Forum can still be seen today, but most of its buildings are in ruins. Nowhere is the word "democracy" mentioned in the Declaration of Independence ...

www.harvardmagazine.com/2006/09/history-and-democracy.html

Sean Wilentz is Dayton-Stockton professor of history and director of the program in American studies at Princeton University. His most recent book, The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln, won the Bancroft Prize. During this academic year, he will be a fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public ...

chnm.gmu.edu/worldhistorysources/r/265/whm.html

Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America is a classic work, one of the first in which an “Old World” author wrote seriously and at length about the American experiment in popular government. This site wisely recommends that users not venerate Tocqueville as a timeless classic. Instead, the site suggests, his work is a product of its time, and so, in addition to delivering the full ...

www.history.com/topics/france/alexis-de-tocqueville

Alexis de Tocqueville: “Democracy in America” As “Democracy in America” revealed, Tocqueville believed that equality was the great political and social idea of his era, and he thought that ...

www.theatlantic.com/.../1893/12/democracy-in-america/523974

The evolution of these two ideas is the history of American politics. Democracy in America records the contest between laws—a conventional system of politics—and men struggling for industrial ...

www.civiced.org/programs/rda

Representative Democracy in America: Voices of the People is a national project designed to reinvigorate and educate Americans on the critical relationship between government and the people it serves. The project introduces citizens, particularly young people, to the representatives, institutions, and processes that serve to realize the goal of a government of, by, and for the people.