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michaelbluejay.com/electricity/refrigerators.htm

How much electricity does my refrigerator use? Last update: April, 2014. Refrigerators are a big chunk of home energy use. In most homes the refrigerator is the second-largest user of electricity (13.7%), right after the air conditioner (14.1%). (Dept. of Energy) With most appliances you save energy by using them less, but you can't very well ...

www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?fuseaction=refrig.calculator

This Flip Your Fridge calculator is designed to provide an estimate of the savings associated with replacing or removing an old refrigerator or freezer with a new ENERGY STAR certified model. Actual savings may vary based on use, upkeep, and other factors.

energyusecalculator.com/electricity_refrigerator.htm

Electricity usage of a Refrigerator. Refrigerators are one of the most common household appliances and are used to preserve food by keeping it cool, most refrigerators also come with a built-in freezer box for freezing food. Modern refrigerators are very energy efficient compared to older models from a few decades ago.

www.wholesalesolar.com/solar-information/how-to-save-energy/power-table

Refrigerators are infamous for using way too much energy. If your existing refrigerator is over 10 years old, replace it with a new energy efficient refrigerator. Newer models are much more energy efficient than the old avocado green refrigerator at grandma's house. New refrigerators don't have to be expensive to be efficient.

reductionrevolution.com.au/blogs/news-reviews/57784517-fridge-power...

The power consumption of domestic fridges is typically between 100 and 200 watts. Over a full day they are likely to use around 1 to 2 kilowatt-hours (kWh). Old domestic refrigerators and commercial refrigerators consume much more. The actual energy consumption of your fridge or freezer will depend on many factors. The

www.daftlogic.com/information-appliance-power-consumption.htm

How much electricity is it really wasting?, and would it not be better to switch off the 4 lights in the room? The best way to compare the cost of running different appliances is to look at their power consumption, which is measure of how much power they use in Watts.The following list points out typical values for the wattage of some devices you would find in your home so that you can compare ...

www.thegeoexchange.org/fridge-power-consumption/index.html

Determining Our Old Fridge's Power Consumption. We bought a Kill-A-Watt meter for about $25 dollars, plugged it into the wall, and then plugged the fridge into the meter. The toughest part was moving the refrigerator and cleaning up five years of dust. After one week we went back and checked the electricity meter (actually we checked it quite a bit during the week).

www.directenergy.com/.../how-much-electricity-does-my-refrigerator-use

How to Estimate Your Refrigerator's Annual Electricity Cost. If you ever find yourself wondering "exactly how much electricity does my fridge use?", you can figure it out as well as your monthly costs if you determine your refrigerator power consumption in watts.

www.kompulsa.com/refrigerator-power-consumption-deciphering-the-label

The power consumption of refrigerators is 400-1,000 kWh per year (this applies to models in the 21-25 cubic-foot range). The average energy usage of modern refrigerators is 400-600 kWh per year. This translates to 33 kWh-50 kWh per month, or an average wattage of 46 to 69 Watts (this equates to an average hourly power consumption of 46 to 69 Wh).

www.energy.gov/energysaver/save-electricity-and-fuel/appliances-and...

Electricity usage monitors are easy to use and can measure the electricity usage of any device that runs on 120 volts. (But it can’t be used with large appliances that use 220 volts, such as electric clothes dryers, central air conditioners, or water heaters.) You can buy electricity usage monitors at most hardware stores for around $25-$50.