The oath of office is the oath made by the president of the United States before assuming the presidency as required by the U.S. Constitution. The oath is printed in the Constitution in article II, section 1, clause 8 in... More »

While each state has different requirements and oaths, the City of Nichols Hills, Oklahoma, provides a copy of the police officer's oath of office committing the officer to uphold both state and federal law. It emphasize... More »

The Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court typically administers the oath of office to the President of the United States, according to Heritage.org. However, the Constitution of the United States does not specify who m... More »

The Constitution of the United States assigns several powers to the president, including the power to veto or sign legislation, convene or adjourn Congress and command the armed forces. The U.S. President also nominates ... More »

The president of the United States has the power to nominate justices of the Supreme Court with the advice and consent of the Senate, in accordance with Article II, section 2 of the Constitution of the United States. Alt... More »

As of October 2014, the vice president of the United States is Joseph Robinette Biden, Jr. Biden took office in January of 2009 and is the nation's 47th vice president. More »

The U.S. presidential line of succession is the set order of officials who act as the President of the United States if the president dies, becomes incapacitated, resigns or is removed from office by impeachment. The Pre... More »