Mutualism refers to an ecological interaction involving two species from which both benefit. These relationships can take place within one species or between different species. Mutualism can also occur with individuals i... More »

Two common examples of mutualism in the tundra biome include the beneficial coexistence between the alga and the fungus in a lichen and the reciprocal partnership between tundra swans and sago pondweed. Mutualism is a ty... More »

One of the most familiar examples of mutualism is a bee and a plant. A bee lands on flowers to gather nectar, and, through this process, the bee and the plant both benefit. More »

Animals such as dogs, rats, squirrels, bears, pigs, skunks, rhinoceroses, badgers, raccoons and foxes are all omnivorous animals. Apes, humans and monkeys are omnivorous too. Most animals that live in close proximity wit... More »

Examples of animals that migrate include butterflies, land animals, birds and whales. Animals migrate for a wide variety of reasons, such finding food as the weather changes or mating in specific locations year after yea... More »

Insects, snails, crabs, lobsters and worms are all examples of invertebrate animals. Spiders and clams are other examples. Invertebrates are animals that do not have a backbone. More »

Some examples of animals found in the class Aves are ducks, hummingbirds, songbirds, woodpeckers, owls and raptors. The class of Aves is composed of birds. It was first developed in 1676 by John Ray and Francis Willughby... More »