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www.foodrenegade.com/would-like-some-wood-pulp-your...

It’s disturbingly unnatural to have wood pulp in your cheese or cotton in your salad dressing. Yes, I said “cotton in your salad dressing.” Thank you, Kraft Foods, for making such statements actually truthful and not merely the figment of a childish, over-active imagination. What can you do? Well, stop buying shredded cheese, for one thing.

www.eater.com/2016/3/3/11153876/cheese-wood-pulp-cellulose...

That's the takeaway from last month's Bloomberg story detailing the use of cellulose (aka wood pulp) in shredded cheese products in the U.S. The use of fillers like cellulose is hotly contested ...

insideyourfood.com/saw-dust-in-shredded-cheese

Shredded Cheese (wood pulp) I was listening to the radio the other day and they were talking about the different fillers and liquids added to foods that we don’t know about. One of the things one caller said was that some shredded cheese has saw dust in it.

blog.ochsner.org/articles/store-bought-shredded-cheese...

It’s a great option because it is a lower calorie cheese with no added carb fillers. It also has better flavor, texture and melts more easily than most pre-shredded cheeses. If you would prefer to buy a pre-shredded cheese, another option is the Whole Foods 365 Shredded 3 Cheese Blend because there are no added carbs or cellulose fiber and it ...

naturalsociety.com/15-companies-whose-products-contain-wood-pulp...

Wood Pulp Is The Cheese: A staple in every American pantry, Parmesan Cheese, has been found to contain high levels of cellulose from wood pulp. But wait…! It’s not just parmesan cheese or shredded cheese, high levels of cellulose additives have been found in a variety of foods.

www.onehundreddollarsamonth.com/whats-in-my-food-how-pre...

I have been buying blocks of cheese to shred for a while. But, the last time I shredded cheese I added a little arrowroot powder (or cornstarch would work) and shook the Tupperware. The cheese hasn’t all clumped together yet so I think that is an improvement.

www.kcet.org/food/pre-shredded-versus-freshly-grated...

To return briefly to the subject of natamycin, the reason anti-mold agents are needed for shredded cheese but not block cheese is that shredded cheese has a lot more total surface area for mold to colonize. Manufacturers recommend using or freezing shredded cheese within a few days of opening the package, while block cheese can keep for weeks.

www.reference.com/food/sawdust-shredded-cheese-5ccb4661f04...

Shredded cheese contains an additive made from powdered wood pulp called cellulose. Cellulose is similar to sawdust in that they are both made from wood, but cellulose is created in a laboratory by chemically separating cellulose from wood or other plant material.

www.snopes.com/fact-check/wood-in-cheese

Castle Cheese was the recipient of a FDA warning letter dated 11 July 2013, and the mention of cellulose had to do with possible labeling inconsistencies, not wood in cheese: 3.

www.ecowatch.com/wal-mart-kraft-sued-over-selling-parmesan...

Wal-Mart's "Great Value 100% Grated Parmesan Cheese" is at the center of new litigation that accuses the brand of, well, not being 100 percent cheese.. Tests shows that the big box retailer's cheese contained as much as 10 percent cellulose, a wood-based additive that prevents clumping in pre-shredded cheese according to a complaint filed yesterday in Manhattan federal court, Blo...