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www.aasc.ucla.edu/cab/200708230009.html

The real mortality of the atomic bombs that were dropped on Japan will never be known. The destruction and overwhelming chaos made orderly counting impossible. It is not unlikely that the estimates of killed and wounded in Hiroshima (150,000) and Nagasaki (75,000) are over conservative.

en.wikipedia.org/.../Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki

[better source needed] The memorials in Hiroshima and Nagasaki contain lists of the names of the hibakusha who are known to have died since the bombings. Updated annually on the anniversaries of the bombings, as of August 2018, the memorials record the names of almost 495,000 hibakusha; 314,118 in Hiroshima and 179,226 in Nagasaki.

www.atomicarchive.com/Docs/MED/med_chp10.shtml

The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by The Manhattan Engineer District, June 29, 1946. Total Casualties. There has been great difficulty in estimating the total casualties in the Japanese cities as a result of the atomic bombing. The extensive destruction of civil installations (hospitals, fire and police department, and government agencies) the state of utter confusion immediately ...

avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/mp10.asp

There has been great difficulty in estimating the total casualties in the Japanese cities as a result of the atomic bombing. The extensive destruction of civil installations (hospitals, fire and police department, and government agencies) the state of utter confusion immediately following the explosion, as well as the uncertainty regarding the actual population before the bombing, contribute ...

www.historyhit.com/how-many-people-died-in-the-hiroshima...

The death tolls of both Hiroshima and Nagasaki are complicated by the protracted impact of nuclear fallout. While many were killed instantly by the blasts – it’s estimated that roughly half the deaths in both attacks occurred on the first day – many more died as a result of radiation sickness and other injuries, long after the detonations.

www.warhistoryonline.com/world-war-ii/lasting-effects...

The exact death toll of the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki is not known. Reports say the total combined death toll of the cities is between 129,000-240,000 while others say it could be higher. What we do know, is that in August of 1945, the United States military dropped a new type of bomb on Hiroshima.

www.atomicheritage.org/history/bombings-hiroshima-and...

For a detailed timeline of the bombings, please see Hiroshima and Nagasaki Bombing Timeline. Hiroshima. On August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima. The bomb was known as "Little Boy", a uranium gun-type bomb that exploded with about thirteen kilotons of force.

www.history.com/.../bombing-of-hiroshima-and-nagasaki

Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Contents. ... Japanese forces inflicted Allied casualties totaling nearly half those suffered in three full years of war in the Pacific, proving that Japan had ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debate_over_the_atomic_bombings_of...

The debate over the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki concerns the ethical, legal, and military controversies surrounding the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6 August and 9 August 1945 at the close of World War II (1939–45). The Soviet Union declared war on Japan an hour before 9 August and invaded Manchuria at one minute past midnight; Japan surrendered on 15 August.

www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/timeline/factfiles/nonflash/a...

Fact File : Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 6 and 9 August 1945. On the morning of 6 August 1945 an American B-29 bomber, the 'Enola Gay', dropped the first atomic bomb used in warfare on the Japanese ...