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theculturetrip.com/north-america/mexico/articles/day-of-the-dead-in-mexico-10...

Day of the Dead, otherwise known as Día de los Muertos, is rather deceptively not a one-day, but a multi-day holiday celebrated annually in Mexico on the first two days of November.Principally a celebration of both life and death in which families commemorate their deceased loved ones, it finds its roots in Mesoamerican culture, although its popularity nowadays is widespread.

www.history.com/topics/halloween/day-of-the-dead

November 2 is All Souls Day or the Day of the Dead. According to tradition, the gates of heaven are opened at midnight on October 31 and the spirits of children can rejoin their families for 24 hours.

www.holidays.net/dayofthedead/customs.htm

Day of the Dead is the Mexican holiday celebrating the spirit of your deceased loved ones. Celebrations traditionally begin at midnight on October 31st and continue until November 2. While each town and region in Mexico has its own unique Day of the Dead customs, there are certain universal traditions that have developed over the centuries.

www.thespruceeats.com/mexican-day-of-the-dead-customs-2342807

Present-day Muertos, celebrated mostly in central and southern Mexico where the indigenous influence is strongest, is a rich mixture of pre-Hispanic and Catholic elements.The original inhabitants of the lands that now make up Mexico remembered their dead at a different time of the year; with their domination by the Spanish, the date was changed to the beginning of November and many motifs were ...

traditionscustoms.com/death-rites/day-of-dead-mexico

The Day of the Dead or „El día de los Muertos“ is one of the most popular holidays in Mexico. The holiday includes two days. On the 1st of November or "Día de los Angelitos" (Day of the Little Angels) Mexicans celebrate babies and children. On the 2nd of November or "Día de los Muertos" or "Día de los Difuntos" (Day of the Dead) people ...

www.nationalgeographic.com/.../north-america/mexico/top-ten-day-of-dead-mexico

Day of the Dead originated several thousand years ago with the Aztec, Toltec, and other Nahua people, who considered mourning the dead disrespectful. For these pre-Hispanic cultures, death was a ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_of_the_Dead

The Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico developed from ancient traditions among its pre-Columbian cultures. Rituals celebrating the deaths of ancestors had been observed by these civilizations perhaps for as long as 2,500–3,000 years. The festival that developed into the modern Day of the Dead fell in the ninth month of the Aztec calendar, about the beginning of August, and was celebrated ...

www.nationalgeographic.org/media/dia-de-los-muertos

Dia de los Muertos—the Day of the Dead—is a holiday celebrated on November 1. Although marked throughout Latin America, Dia de los Muertos is most strongly associated with Mexico, where the tradition originated. Dia de los Muertos honors the dead with festivals and lively celebrations, a typically Latin American custom that combines indigenous Aztec ritual with Catholicism, brought to the ...

artsandculture.google.com/project/dia-de-muertos

Day of the Dead Explore and celebrate one of Mexico's most magical and popular traditions. A celebration of life. life + death ... Promoting traditional culture through the arts. Death in art. Death in The Eyes of The World. MUMEDI. The Skeleton Following the Footsteps of Diego and Frida.

www.thoughtco.com/day-of-the-dead-honors-deceased-3078093

At first glance, the Mexican custom of the Día de Muertos—the Day of the Dead—may sound much like the U.S. custom of Halloween.After all, the celebration traditionally starts at midnight the night of Oct. 31, and the festivities are abundant in images related to death.