The citric acid cycle is a series of chemical reactions whereby acetate molecules from food are broken down into carbon dioxide, water and energy. It is the principal method by which all aerobic organisms generate energy... More »

The citric acid cycle takes place in the matrix of the mitochondria in cells. It is also known as the Krebs cycle, or the TCA cycle. This process is an essential part of aerobic respiration. More »

Clinton Community College explains that pyruvate is converted into acetyl coenzyme A before entering the citric acid, or Krebs, cycle. A carbon atom is removed from each of the two molecules of pyruvate, yielding acetyl ... More »

The main types of biochemical reactions are reduction and oxidation, water addition and removal, bond breaking reactions and the movement of groups between molecules. There are many possible types of biochemical reaction... More »

The citric acid cycle takes place in the matrix of the mitochondria in cells. It is also known as the Krebs cycle, or the TCA cycle. This process is an essential part of aerobic respiration. More »

Clinton Community College explains that pyruvate is converted into acetyl coenzyme A before entering the citric acid, or Krebs, cycle. A carbon atom is removed from each of the two molecules of pyruvate, yielding acetyl ... More »

Under aerobic conditions, glycolysis produces pyruvic acid and then converts to acetyl coenzyme A to enter the citric acid cycle. Acetyl coenzyme A links glycolysis and the citric acid cycle together. More »

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