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answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091213093617AAN51Sf

The North Pole is tilted 23.5 degrees away from the Sun relative to the circle of illumination during the December solstice. On this date, all places above a latitude of 66.5 degrees N are now in darkness, while locations below a latitude of 66.5 degrees S receive 24 hours of daylight.

www.reference.com/science/circle-illumination-829bc2149e2d7b96

The circle of illumination is the line that separates the Earth to create equal parts of day and night. It passes through the poles and allows the entire Earth to have an equal amount of time spent during the daylight and nighttime hours. The circle of illumination divides the Earth in exactly half.

quizlet.com/127362618/geo-102-final-part-4-flash-cards

Start studying GEO 102 Final Part 4. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. ... Which of the following is true for the December Solstice? ... Which of the following is true for the September Equinox? The circle of illumination passes through both the poles. Based on your understanding of the march of ...

www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/6h.html

The Arctic Circle experiences 24 hours of night when the North Pole is tilted 23.5 degrees away from the Sun in the December solstice. During the two equinoxes, the circle of illumination cuts through the polar axis and all locations on the Earth experience 12 hours of day and night.

quizlet.com/37283476/geography-chapter-2-flash-cards

Start studying Geography Chapter 2. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search. ... equator and circle of illumination passes through both poles. Winter solstic. solstice occurring on ... December solstice • Further north of equator, shorter days • 0 hours at south pole.

earthonlinemedia.com/ipg/outlines/lecture_earth_sun_relations.html

The circle of illumination is the division between day and night over the earth. The circle of illumination bisects (cuts in half) all latitudes on the spring and autumnal equinoxes. At this time, all places have equal day length (12 hours).

www.answers.com/Q/When_does_The_circle_of_illumination_touch_the_Antarctic_Circle

That happens twice a year ...-- At the moment of the December solstice, the Antarctic Circle is completely. inside the circle of illumination, and tangent to it on the inside.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_solstice

Illumination of Earth by the Sun on the day of the December solstice. The December solstice, is the solstice that occurs each December – typically on Dec 21, and can vary ± 1 day according to the Gregorian calendar. In the Northern Hemisphere, ...

science.jrank.org/pages/6261/Solar-Illumination-Seasonal-Diurnal-Patterns.html

At summer solstice (approximately June 21), there is perpetual sunlight within the Arctic Circle (i.e., the Arctic Circle is fully illuminated). The illumination patterns in the polar regions—within the Artic Circle and Antarctic Circle—are dynamic and inverse.

faculty.kutztown.edu/courtney/blackboard/Physical/21Seasons/seasons.html

On December 21, the north pole is pointed away from the sun (C in Figure 5 and Figure 9). This causes the subsolar point to be as far south as it ever goes, 23°30' S (the Tropic of Capricorn). The circle of illumination is offset once again this time making the day short and the night long in the Northern Hemisphere.