When you freeze fresh fruit, you preserve its color and flavor, stopping the ripening process when the fruit is at its best. However, freezing affects fruits’ texture, breaking down and softening meats because water expa... More »

www.reference.com Food Food Storage Freezing Food

Freeze fresh, ripe tomatoes quickly and easily by washing and drying them, trimming the stem scar and arranging them in a single layer on a plate or baking sheet. Place the tomatoes in the freezer until frozen. Store fro... More »

www.reference.com Food Food Storage Freezing Food

Foods that are easy to freeze include hot and cold sauces, stocks and soups, chili and stews, and baked pasta dishes. Cookie and pizza dough, bread, rolls and flour tortillas are easy-to-freeze foods. Fresh fruits and ve... More »

www.reference.com Food Food Storage Freezing Food

To freeze fresh berries quickly and easily, wash the berries, pat them dry with a towel, remove any stems or damaged fruit, and place them in a single layer on a baking sheet to freeze. Once the berries are frozen solid,... More »

www.reference.com Food Food Storage Freezing Food

When you freeze lemons, you preserve the whole fruit for later use. Although the texture of the meat of the lemon may be mushy when thawed, freezing leaves the flavors of the juice and rind intact. Because fresh lemons f... More »

www.reference.com Food Food Storage Freezing Food

Safely freeze baked fruit pies for up to four months or unbaked pies up to three months. Cream-based and custard pies do not freeze well. Freeze baked crusts for up to four months and unbaked crusts for up to two months. More »

www.reference.com Food Food Storage Freezing Food

The only way to properly freeze uncooked potatoes is to cut and blanch them, which helps maintain their texture and flavor. Raw potatoes that are frozen without blanching become very watery and lose their structure when ... More »