HIV can not be transmitted or spread through saliva, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The only way that an HIV-positive person can transmit HIV to another person through kissing is if both peo... More »

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HIV is not spread through saliva. HIV is not transmittable through close contact such as kissing, hugging and using the same dishes or drinking glasses. More »

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Human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, is transmitted through contact with specific bodily fluids, including semen, vaginal and rectal fluids, blood, and breast milk, according to AIDS.gov. Infection may occur during acti... More »

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A person may contract Ebola following contact with an infected individual's blood, urine, sweat, semen, breast milk, saliva, feces and other body fluids, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trans... More »

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Symptoms of HIV include fever, sore throat, enlarged lymph nodes and rash, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, symptoms alone should not be used to determine HIV status, since some ... More »

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Health departments, community centers and other organizations offer free HIV testing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To find free HIV testing centers, visit GetTested.CDC.gov, enter a ZIP co... More »

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The probability of contracting HIV is highest during a transfusion of infected blood, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The risk per 10,000 exposures is 9,250. Receptive anal intercourse is the... More »

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