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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brussels_sprout

The Brussels sprout is a member of the Gemmifera Group of cabbages (Brassica oleracea), grown for its edible buds.. The leafy green vegetables are typically 1.5–4.0 cm (0.6–1.6 in) in diameter and look like miniature cabbages. The Brussels sprout has long been popular in Brussels, Belgium, and may have gained its name there.

www.kitchenproject.com/history/Brussels-Sprouts/index.htm

The origin of the cultivar (selectively bred as opposed to wild) Brussels Sprouts is not exact, but the French coined the name in the 18th century. It was common to put a landmark on a food. Whether they actually were developed in Brussels in Belgium is not certain.

www.southernliving.com/news/brussels-sprouts-name-origin

It has to do with the origin of how Brussels sprouts got their name. "Brussels sprouts are named after the fact that they were cultivated in Belgium in the 16th century," explains Christine Gallary on The Kitchn. "Knowing this little fact will also help you remember that it's Brussels sprouts, ...

www.reference.com/food/did-brussels-sprouts-originate-55dd...

Modern-day Brussels sprouts originated in the country of Belgium. This vegetable began to be cultivated in Belgium in the late 1500s. Earlier forms of Brussels sprouts date back to Rome in the 1200s, but were different than the ones grown today.

www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Brussels_sprout

The term "Brussels sprout" is a countable noun whose plural form is Brussels sprouts. A commonly used alternative form is brussel sprout, whose plural is brussel sprouts. However, linking the name with the Belgian capital of Brussels would argue against dropping the last "s" in the first word (although the Dutch name for the city is "Brussel").

www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/where-does-the-name-brussels...

Brussels sprouts have a mysterious and puzzling history. Some writers suggest they were eaten in classical times, but according to the English food writer Jane Grigson, they are first mentioned in ...

www.foodandwine.com/blogs/short-history-brussels-sprouts

Over the last 50 years, brussels sprouts have gone from reviled to revered. Here, 6 milestones in their history. 1960s—Overcooked and Stinky Home cooks bring out brussels sprouts' worst side by ...

www.reluctantgourmet.com/all-about-brussels-sprouts

Whatever the temporal period, Brussels sprouts were cultivated in Belgium and hence were eponymously named after its capital city. The French introduced them to Louisiana in 1800. Today most American Brussels sprouts hail from California and end up in frozen products.

www.foodrepublic.com/2013/02/19/11-things-you-probably-did...

Depending on where you live, it could be your last chance to eat Brussels sprouts for awhile. These hearty winter vegetables are usually in season from fall through late winter. Like Barbie-sized cabbages, they are delicious when roasted, stir-fried or even steamed, if you don’t overdo it. And if you’ve never peeled away the leaves to make crispy baked Brussels sprouts chips, then, boy ...

www.dictionary.com/browse/brussels-sprout

Brussels sprouts. any of the heads or buds, eaten as a vegetable. ... (Its origin involves cussing) Every so often, surprises seem to pop out of the mouths of public figures like a Jack-in-the-Box. CNN reporter Rick Sanchez lost his job Friday for a few eyebrow-raising comments he made on the radio. Among other things, Sanchez called the ...