A combination of ice, antihistamines and pain medication makes the best treatment for a wasp sting, according to WebMD. For people who are not allergic to wasp stings, no more medical care is necessary. More »

www.reference.com Health Insect & Animal Bites

Wasp stings generally require only treatment at home, including taking the stinger out (if present), washing the site of the sting, and applying ice to reduce swelling. Pain medications and antihistamines may also be nee... More »

Wasps sting but do not leave the stinger behind as bees do. Therefore, the wasp is able to sting again. Stings are typically treated with an injectable epinephrine if the person is allergic. More »

Removing the stinger, applying ice, and using antihistamines and pain medications are treatments for a wasp sting on any part of the body, as stated by WebMD. Washing the site of the sting and getting a tetanus booster a... More »

www.reference.com Health Insect & Animal Bites

Depending on whether a yellow jacket sting causes a mild or severe reaction, there are different treatment options, including using cold compresses, taking pain medication or antihistamines, applying soothing lotions and... More »

www.reference.com Health Insect & Animal Bites

Place ice wrapped in a washcloth on a wasp sting for approximately 20 minutes each hour, according to WebMD. Wash the site with soap and water, and then apply antibiotic ointment. Use ibuprofen for pain and an antihistam... More »

www.reference.com Health Insect & Animal Bites

A good way to ease the pain of a wasp sting is to apply ice or a cold pack to the area, according to Healthline. Over-the-counter pain medicine, such as ibuprofen, can also be used to ease the pain. More »

www.reference.com Health Insect & Animal Bites