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www.aztec-history.com/aztec-food.html

Aztec food. Aztec food was a rich combination of many foods that we take for granted today. Not only is much of this rich diet still common in Mexico today, it's spread around the world. Here's a look at some of what the ancient Mexica peoples ate: Maize. Maize (also called corn or mealies) was the staple grain of the Aztec empire. Maize has ...

www.ancient.eu/Aztec_Civilization

The Aztec Empire flourished between c. 1345 and 1521 CE and, at its greatest extent, covered most of northern Mesoamerica. Aztec warriors were able to dominate their neighbouring states and permit rulers such as Motecuhzoma II to impose Aztec ideals and religion across Mexico. Highly accomplished in agriculture and trade, the last of the great Mesoamerican civilizations was also noted for its ...

www.aztec-indians.com/aztec-food.html

Like the food common to modern day Mexico, Aztec food tended to be both rich and spicy. In fact, many of the ancient Aztec foods were flavored with chili peppers and contained spicy sauces. In addition, the main food of the Aztecs was the tlaxcalli, which was a corn-meal pancake similar to the modern day tortilla.

www.historyonthenet.com/aztec-empire-everyday-foods-and-feasts

Aztec commoners ate a predominantly vegetarian diet, occasionally flavored with meat or fish. The maguey plant provided not only food in the form of sweets, but an alcoholic drink called pulque and fiber for clothing. Chilies added heat and spice to many dishes as well as providing vitamins A and C to the Aztec diet.

healthyeating.sfgate.com/kind-food-did-aztecs-eat-9367.html

Beans were another food staple in the Aztec diet because they, like corn, were a good source of protein. According to Smith, beans were served at every meal in the Aztec culture. The beans were soaked in water for several hours and then boiled until they were soft, which is the same method still used today to prepare whole beans.

www.mexicolore.co.uk/aztecs/kids/aztec-foods

Basic Aztec facts: AZTEC FOODS Without animals like cows, sheep and goats, the Mexica (Aztec) diet was mainly veg, fruit and grains. Top of the list was maize (corn), an ancient and sacred crop that can grow almost anywhere.The early cultivation of maize by settled farmers thousands of years ago allowed all great Mesoamerican civilisations to flourish...

www.ancient.eu/article/723

The Aztec civilization, which flourished in central Mexico between c. 1345 and 1521 CE, was able to provide, through a combination of climatic advantages, diverse artificial irrigation methods, and extensive farming know-how, an astonishingly wide range of agricultural produce that gave them one of ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aztec_cuisine

Aztec cuisine is the cuisine of the former Aztec Empire and the Nahua peoples of the Valley of Mexico prior to European contact in 1519.. The most important staple was corn (), a crop that was so important to Aztec society that it played a central part in their mythology.Just like wheat in much of Europe or rice in most of East Asia, it was the food without which a meal was not a meal.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aztec

Aztec culture and history has been central to the formation of a Mexican national identity after Mexican independence in 1821. In 17th and 18th century Europe, the Aztecs were generally described as barbaric, gruesome and culturally inferior.

www.history.com/topics/ancient-americas/aztecs

In the great cities of the Aztec empire, magnificent temples, palaces, plazas and statues embodied the civilization’s unfailing devotion to the many Aztec gods, including Huitzilopochtli (god of ...