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www.reference.com/article/can-fix-undercooked-pie-4d39d7ee322b412f

There are a couple of strategies for recooking an undercooked pie. The easiest is to cover the pie with aluminum foil, place it back in the oven and bake it at 425 to 450 F for around 12 minutes.

www.reference.com/slideshow/undercooked-celebrity-restaurant-ventures

Studies show that roughly one in four restaurants fail within their first year of business, and an additional one in five don’t make it to their second anniversary. Apart from the name recognition factor, celebrities don’t have it much easier when trying to launch a new...

www.reference.com/article/dangers-eating-potatoes-someone-diabetes-8b7127b77a5f0f99

There are no dangers of eating potatoes for diabetics, providing they eat them in moderation, the American Diabetes Association states. There are multiple myths surrounding diabetic diets, including patients not being able to eat sweets or anything other than specialist...

www.reference.com/article/potatoes-bad-eat-4429fac04e714370

Potatoes that have green skin spots, are moldy or develop sprouts are potentially bad to eat. While moldy or mushy potatoes should be discarded, it is possible to save a potato with a green skin spot or sprout if this part is completely cut away.

www.reference.com/article/potatoes-bad-e6582608711704d4

Potatoes do eventually go bad. Their exact shelf life depends on the type of potato, but most go bad after two to five weeks at room temperature or two to four months in a refrigerator.

www.reference.com/article/potato-diseases-6f10d751f9e15daf

Potato diseases include infestations of the root, leaves and tubers caused by bacteria, fungi and other viruses. Common potato diseases include potato wart, soft rot and potato blight, according to the American Phytopathological Society. A complete list of potato diseas...

www.reference.com/article/many-types-potatoes-1afc17262b6f11d2

According to The United States Potato Board, seven types of potatoes are commonly enjoyed by consumers: russet, long white, round white, fingerlings, red, yellow and blue or purple. The potato industry refers to them as table-stock varieties.