Orange ladybugs are not poisonous and do not pose a threat to humans. Likewise, ladybugs of other colors, including the well-known black and red species, are not poisonous. More »

There are more than 5,000 species of ladybugs and they are only poisonous to smaller animals such as birds and lizards. Ladybugs are not considered poisonous to humans. However, people that accidentally consume a ladybug... More »

Ladybugs are not poisonous, but they secrete a foul-tasting liquid when threatened by predators. This fluid is secreted from their joints. A threatened ladybug can also play dead to protect itself from a predator. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Beetles

Ladybugs need air, like humans, but unlike humans they do not have lungs. Instead, they take in air through tiny openings in the sides of their abdomen and thorax called spiracles. The distribution of oxygen in ladybugs'... More »

There are more than 5,000 species of ladybugs and they are only poisonous to smaller animals such as birds and lizards. Ladybugs are not considered poisonous to humans. However, people that accidentally consume a ladybug... More »

Orange oil, an extract from orange peels, is effective in controlling termites. Orange oil is not considered an absolute eradicator of a termite population, but it does allow for the management of an existing infestation... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs

Ladybugs, also known as ladybirds or lady beetles, are generally harmless to humans and pets. While they do produce toxic chemicals, the primary effect of the chemicals is to make the beetles smell and taste bad to preda... More »